Friday, August 31, 2012

Two Reasons Why Upper Cervical Care is Attractive


Adapted from "Chiropractic is attractive because..."


1. It trusts the wisdom of the body.

Many upper cervical doctors overlook this when explaining upper cervical care to patients. Perhaps this is because the allure of showing up as the hero, mimicking the attitude of traditional doctors, is more gratifying than telling the truth about the nature of healing. In other words, doctors, of any ilk, don't heal. Nor do drugs. Or adjustments!

Recovering one's health is a shedding process not an acquiring process. Which is to say, we each have within us the ability to heal. Usually, health can manifest by reducing obstructions or interferences rather than filling a void because something is missing.

We're not flawed, we're merely blocked. We're not deficient, we're merely constrained from our fullest expression. We're not suffering a drug shortage, we're merely exceeding our ability to accommodate one or more stressors. Patients are fully equipped for health. It's not you, it's them.

2. It’s simple.

By the second quarter in college, many upper cervical doctors have lost the simple elegance and minimalism of the care they provide. Obfuscated by technique, practice procedures, physiology and beneath layers of dogma and seminar rhetoric, upper cervical doctors sometimes emerge later as spinal therapists, medical doctor wannabes, patient pleasers or just confused.

The principles of upper cervical care often take a backseat to the practice of it and the "how" of practice often eclipses the "why." In the process, patients rarely learn that their nervous system controls the whole show and releasing their potential to self heal and function optimally, mediated by the nervous system is the focus of upper cervical care—not pain relief, posture restoration or even "treating" subluxations.

Obviously, this creates a major communication challenge. This week ask your upper cervical doctor to tell you the truth. And to do it simply. Because as Einstein observed, "If you can't explain something simply, you don't understand it well enough."

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